Advertiser classifieds sex project

advertiser classifieds sex project

Same thing happens with beer and Doritos ads during the timeouts of football games. Your nervous energy is craving savory foods to chomp and a cold beverage to wash them down.

You can use the same time-proven techniques to find love, without selling out. Just be true to your own personal brand. Here is how it can work for you:. That means you need to know whom you want to go after and what these potential partners are looking for in a mate.

It helps if you focus first on them and less on yourself…at least for this step. Most men I know seek the same core qualities in a female partner—trust, a sense of humor, someone they enjoy hanging out with, someone who has similar interests and values, and of course, sex.

Next, you need to know where they can be found. I am sure you know where people hang out in the city. Bars, gyms, classes, work, clubs, the park, ball games, etc.

If you cannot find someone interesting in the city, invest in a new pair of glasses. Every so often it helps to take a step back and re-examine who we are, what we are and how we roll. Many of us make the same mistakes over and over when it comes to relationships. It could be our attitude towards the opposite sex, how we present ourselves, or even that mental checklist for sizing up potential partners that might include everything from his bank account or his shoes, to her height or her cup size.

Once you know who you are and what you want, consider what qualities you can offer a potential partner that is totally you— your special sauce, if you will.

Yes, like on a Big Mac. When marketers discuss sex and advertising, the central issue is invariably: Advertising professor Tom Reichert spent more than a decade researching the history of sexual images and references in order to write The Erotic History of Advertising Before he was able to provide an answer to this question, he had first to define what sex in advertising is. Defining it proved no simple matter, but here are his basic guidelines: Sexy clothing and revealing displays of the human body represent a fundamental type of sexual information.

Click to view video. Beauty and good looks turn people on, and advertisers use attractive models to draw attention. Models can pose seductively. They can communicate sexual interest by flirting with the viewer or with someone else in the ad.

These images can include touching, kissing, or simulation of sexual behavior. Phrases that have innocent meanings can be transformed when they are accompanied by sexual images. FYI… Read a fuller statement by Reichert on: After reviewing evidence from the mids to the early s, Reichert concludes that using sex in advertising has frequently, but not always, increased consumer interest and often aided in the selling products and building strong brand identities.

However, he notes that academic research on its effects has yielded equivocal and inconsistent conclusions, making it exceedingly difficult to render a clear verdict on its effectiveness. Despite this caveat, Reichert believes that several companies—such as Calvin Klein and Victoria's Secret—have succeeded in linking erotic appeals with commercial success.

Likewise, public response has varied considerably. Some consumers respond with their pocketbooks to the sexual promises in ads while others complain that sexual imagery in ads oversteps the bounds of propriety.

The advertising images that follow are indicative of many but certainly not all of the things that advertising says about sex. Taken together, they indicate not only the typical but also the extremes to which advertising has gone in linking eroticism to the selling process.

These ads not only attempt to sell various products soap, beer, cars, underwear, etc. They tell us what is sexy, they show people in various states of love-making, they idealize and idolize certain kinds of bodies over others, they depict "vanilla" as well as "alternative" forms of sexual behavior, and so on. In short, the ads not only sell products but also sell a particular conception of sex itself.

What does sex in advertising sell? Above all else, advertising images have depicted heterosexuality as the norm throughout. There are exceptions as we shall see, but the most frequent representations are the one-male, one-female type. Moreover, it is usually the male who assumes the more dominant position and role, while the female is generally receptive and somewhat passive.

Most typically, the ad suggests and hints at sexual relations between the couple—often showing them in some sort of sexual foreplay.

However, some ads go so far as to leave little doubt that the couple is engaged in sexual intercourse. Here a man stands before a woman whose widespread legs admit him to her most intimate body zone.

Their pose suggests the heightened excitement of a "quickie" for which she has not yet had the time to remove all of her clothes. Heterosexuality is the Traditional Norm in Advertising Nowadays, this heteronormativity is giving way to a variety of non-"traditional" alternatives. It is common to see one man with multiple female partners, a pattern that appears to be a widely shared sexual fantasy among heterosexual men.

However, there are also situations in which the female partner assumes a more active and dominant role, and situations in which the one-male, one-female relationship gives way to a variety of other possibilities. Gay relationships have also entered the world of sex as depicted in ads. They are to be found in ads for beer, over-the-counter medicines, life insurance, tires, and just about everything else.

In a world so dominated by heteronormativity, it would be remiss to speak of a parallel homonormativity, because such depictions are still relatively few in number compared to the much more frequent imagery of heterosexuality.

Advertisers are careful about their placement of such ads as well. Venues for depictions of gay relationships are restricted. FYI… Read about the protests against the Tylenol ad showing two men in bed with one another. The following ad for Tylenol shows two men in the same bed close enough to be touching.

Lest there is any doubt about their relationship, the ad speaks of them as boyfriends. This particular ad ran in The Advocate , a gay-oriented magazine. However, a fundamentalist Christian group found the ad and organized a write-in campaign to the company complaining about its apparent support of the gay lifestyle. These Two Men are Clearly Partners Not all depictions of close relationships between men are necessarily gay. The terms homosocial and homoerotic describe some of these other possibilities.

Homosociality is the situation of men being in close or intimate relationship with other men and does not imply either homosexuality or heterosexuality whereas homoerotic refers to erotic imagery that depicts same-sex people in a sexualized manner.

The image below shows two men lying together on a bed or blanket in their underwear. Their relationship is clearly homosocial, but their touching, intimacy, and exhibitionism suggests the possibility of homoeroticism as well. Most significantly, the ad confronts the cultural taboo concerning homophobia by permitting extreme closeness between men, sharing intimacy even if it is not specifically sexual , and expressing emotional warmth.

Perhaps the appeal of this kind of display for straight men is the relief it offers from strict do's and don'ts when it comes to relating to other men. FYI… Critics of advertising decry fashion's objectification of women and its glamorization of violence, abuse, and even rape. Search "objectification of women in fashion advertising" on the Internet.

The world of fashion appears to have an easier time pushing all kinds of limits in its depictions. Lesbian chic is everywhere. Men dominate and abuse women. It almost seems anything goes when it comes to fashion. This Sisley Ad Eroticizes Abuse circa Humor is a mainstay in the domain of sex and advertising.

This humor is often adolescent and ribald and typically serves to bolster male bravado about penis size and power. Here are some examples: The Burger King ad below employs male adolescent humor: It has been passed around on the Internet on various websites and elicited this response from Burger King:.

This advertisement is running to support a limited promotion in the Singapore market and is not running in the U. This idea of a sandwich that is so large it will stretch the limits of one's mouth seems to have been used Burger King advertising elsewhere.

The one below was used in Germany in Note that again the model is female, although in reality men might be more likely to order enormous sandwiches than women. When ads like this resonate with the public—or at least a certain segment of it—they often become the subject of parodies.

An Internet site took the Burger King ad from Germany and substituted the name of a different advertiser—Durex condoms. In this case, it is clear that the woman's mouth was injured from sex rather than food. Examples of phallus-shaped products abound in the world of marketing.

One need only think of cylindrical bottles with caps, or foods like sausages and cucumbers, and so on. However, there are some instances where products are made to look distinctly like male or female genitals. In a Bici ad from Italy, the choice of the particular pieces of bread and their placement specifically suggest an erect penis. Even the testicles are present in this image. Further, the connection between bread as life and the biology of reproduction is present.

There are no subtleties here. The Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas used the play on words "buck all night" to appeal to the largely adult male audience of a rodeo event. The Nevada Gaming Commission objected to the billboard's overt sexual content and required it to be removed. Sexual humor is used to promote all manner of products—fast food, condoms, soap, and beer.

Sometimes the images that appear to be ads are not even ads, but rather parodies or imagined ads where the same male bravado about penis size and power is highlighted. Both kinds illustrate an important point about how humor is typically used in advertising: It is the male point of view that is nearly always privileged. There is no parallel celebration of the power of the vagina—a power to please oneself and one's partner, a power to generate new life, a power to engulf as opposed to penetrate.

What does it mean to call an ad pornographic? It depends, of course, on how pornography is defined. Historically this has been the subject of debate, contention, and legal opinions. Critics have described fashion designer and film director Tom Ford's advertisements as "artistic. Certainly, from the point of view of composition, lighting, suggestiveness, beauty, allure, and a host of other attributes, they can be said to be deserving of attention and commentary.

For the world of advertising, Ford's work parallels the work of other daring artists who have done such avant-garde things as placing a crucifix in a bottle of urine or wrapping large buildings in plastic. Is This Erotica or Pornography? Edmund Miller's encyclopedia entry on erotica as a literary genre describes its difference from pornography this way:.

As a literary genre, pornography is writing that has sexual arousal as its primary objective. Erotica is such material with artistic pretensions. Thus, the descriptive term pornography implies a statement about intentionality and instrumentality without reference to merit, whereas the term erotica is evaluative and laudatory.

In Flesh and the Word , John Preston more baldly says, "The only difference is that erotica is the stuff bought by rich people. Since current literary theory makes writing of every sort available to analysis, it has in effect done away with the distinction.

To discuss the aesthetic effect of pornographic material is to accord it the status of erotica. This same distinction applies also to the world of visual art and thus to advertising. Is the Tom Ford ad erotica or pornography? It might be called pornographic because the bottle of men's fragrance is placed between the woman's breasts, suggesting mammary intercourse. Some would call this kind of imagery pornographic.

Others, however, would see this as a sexually charged, artistic work that pushes the limits of the conventional and encourages the spectator to think in a specific way about the product and the brand. Thus, the same image—depending how the audience responds to it—can be either pornographic or erotic. Thus, discussions about some of the most explicit advertising garner two kinds of responses.

First, there are those who see it as pornographic and inappropriate for public cultural spaces. They would like to see it censored and banned. Often their arguments are couched in religious terms, or in terms of protecting the innocence of children. Second, there are those who see it as erotica and thus indeed appropriate for public culture. They enjoy being challenged by the images and discussions that surround them.

The marketers and advertisers who produce it belong, of course, to this latter world. They speak of it as "pushing the limits" and "breaking through the clutter. The relationship between advertising and sex also includes those instances when sexually related products and services are being promoted.

Such things include erectile dysfunction drugs, condoms, genital hygiene products, birth control, and so on. In many of these ads, sex itself is made a lot less explicit than we have seen in other instances. The topics discussed and the products themselves are handled more delicately and even indirectly. Imagine, for instance, a condom ad or an erectile dysfunction ad that actually showed the product at work.

Here is an example of what we find instead: The ad makes it clear that these are heterosexual couples in committed relationships. It makes love and intimacy a large part of the imagery 46 and asks, "when the moment is right, will you be ready? Although these drugs are sometimes used recreationally, and by gay as well as straight men, such matters go unmentioned in the ads. Nonetheless, there are many critics of this advertising. For example, US Congressman Jim Moran D-VA recently proposed banning these commercials during early evening hours when children are likely to be a part of the audience.

A number of people have come up, including colleagues and said, "I'm fed up. I don't want my three- or four-year old grandkid asking me what erectile dysfunction is all about. Pfizer offers its Viagra advertising schedule each week for posting on the Parents Television Council's website so that people who may wish to avoid them may do so.

Condom ads, once banned on US television, are now accepted on many broadcast and cable channels as well as on the Internet. These ads in general depart from the indirectness of ED advertising and talk much more explicitly about sex. The following ad, which ran on MTV, shows a much bolder side of sex—a young, experienced woman about to have an interracial one-night stand.

The only euphemism present is her rather sarcastic, "Gotta have the ticket if you want to ride the ride. The subject of female hygiene spray has been much discussed as an instance of the appropriateness of the product itself as well as the way it is discussed and talked about in ads. Less common, although present from time to time, is the recognition that men have distinctive male odors as well.

The short-lived NodorO product threatened men with sexual rejection unless they used it to eliminate the possibility of odors. Both members of the public and academic critics of advertising sometimes consider that advertising steps over the line of decency and appropriateness in its representations. As noted earlier, certain fundamentalist Christian groups have objected to depictions of gay relationships while others in the society consider them appropriate, refreshing, and even celebratory.

Additionally, a US Congressman wants to restrict commercials for ED drugs to times when young children are not likely to be watching television.

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: Advertiser classifieds sex project

Advertiser classifieds sex project Sexism as a term is analogous to racism the negative stereotyping of individuals based on their membership in a social category based on skin color. Homosociality is the situation of men being in close or intimate relationship with other men and does not imply either homosexuality or heterosexuality whereas homoerotic refers to erotic imagery that depicts same-sex people in a sexualized manner. Sex, gender, sexism, sexualityand so on, often lack clarity and specificity in everyday language. In this case, it is clear that the woman's mouth escorts on encounters movie injured from sex rather than food. That is daunting to young people. These older examples tell an important story that, 1 sex and advertising goes back a very long way, and 2 the kinds of imagery that are acceptable have changed with the times. The Nevada Gaming Commission objected to the billboard's overt sexual content and required it to be removed.
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Advertiser classifieds sex project Although a relatively small number of people do not fit this generalization, the vast majority is either distinctively male or female. Most typically, the ad suggests and hints at sexual relations between the couple—often showing them in some sort of sexual foreplay. Alberti asked each of his subjects to sit on a stool in front of him and pleasure themselves with one of the brand's products. Such things include erectile dysfunction drugs, condoms, genital hygiene products, birth control, and so on. Aussies caught up in Ticketmaster data hack attack News Thousands hacked from malicious software discovered, advertiser classifieds sex project. Queensland beef producer and rural leader, Georgie Somerset, said any help that rural employers could have in addressing sexual harassment was a step forward.

The story is one of continually pushing the limits of erotic appeals until we arrive at the present situation where erotic imagery is a mainstay of advertising.

FYI… Visit Professor Reichert's website for further discussion of a definition of sex in advertising. When marketers discuss sex and advertising, the central issue is invariably: Advertising professor Tom Reichert spent more than a decade researching the history of sexual images and references in order to write The Erotic History of Advertising Before he was able to provide an answer to this question, he had first to define what sex in advertising is.

Defining it proved no simple matter, but here are his basic guidelines: Sexy clothing and revealing displays of the human body represent a fundamental type of sexual information. Click to view video. Beauty and good looks turn people on, and advertisers use attractive models to draw attention. Models can pose seductively. They can communicate sexual interest by flirting with the viewer or with someone else in the ad.

These images can include touching, kissing, or simulation of sexual behavior. Phrases that have innocent meanings can be transformed when they are accompanied by sexual images. FYI… Read a fuller statement by Reichert on: After reviewing evidence from the mids to the early s, Reichert concludes that using sex in advertising has frequently, but not always, increased consumer interest and often aided in the selling products and building strong brand identities.

However, he notes that academic research on its effects has yielded equivocal and inconsistent conclusions, making it exceedingly difficult to render a clear verdict on its effectiveness. Despite this caveat, Reichert believes that several companies—such as Calvin Klein and Victoria's Secret—have succeeded in linking erotic appeals with commercial success. Likewise, public response has varied considerably. Some consumers respond with their pocketbooks to the sexual promises in ads while others complain that sexual imagery in ads oversteps the bounds of propriety.

The advertising images that follow are indicative of many but certainly not all of the things that advertising says about sex. Taken together, they indicate not only the typical but also the extremes to which advertising has gone in linking eroticism to the selling process.

These ads not only attempt to sell various products soap, beer, cars, underwear, etc. They tell us what is sexy, they show people in various states of love-making, they idealize and idolize certain kinds of bodies over others, they depict "vanilla" as well as "alternative" forms of sexual behavior, and so on.

In short, the ads not only sell products but also sell a particular conception of sex itself. What does sex in advertising sell? Above all else, advertising images have depicted heterosexuality as the norm throughout. There are exceptions as we shall see, but the most frequent representations are the one-male, one-female type. Moreover, it is usually the male who assumes the more dominant position and role, while the female is generally receptive and somewhat passive.

Most typically, the ad suggests and hints at sexual relations between the couple—often showing them in some sort of sexual foreplay. However, some ads go so far as to leave little doubt that the couple is engaged in sexual intercourse. Here a man stands before a woman whose widespread legs admit him to her most intimate body zone. Their pose suggests the heightened excitement of a "quickie" for which she has not yet had the time to remove all of her clothes. Heterosexuality is the Traditional Norm in Advertising Nowadays, this heteronormativity is giving way to a variety of non-"traditional" alternatives.

It is common to see one man with multiple female partners, a pattern that appears to be a widely shared sexual fantasy among heterosexual men. However, there are also situations in which the female partner assumes a more active and dominant role, and situations in which the one-male, one-female relationship gives way to a variety of other possibilities.

Gay relationships have also entered the world of sex as depicted in ads. They are to be found in ads for beer, over-the-counter medicines, life insurance, tires, and just about everything else. In a world so dominated by heteronormativity, it would be remiss to speak of a parallel homonormativity, because such depictions are still relatively few in number compared to the much more frequent imagery of heterosexuality.

Advertisers are careful about their placement of such ads as well. Venues for depictions of gay relationships are restricted. FYI… Read about the protests against the Tylenol ad showing two men in bed with one another. The following ad for Tylenol shows two men in the same bed close enough to be touching. Lest there is any doubt about their relationship, the ad speaks of them as boyfriends.

This particular ad ran in The Advocate , a gay-oriented magazine. However, a fundamentalist Christian group found the ad and organized a write-in campaign to the company complaining about its apparent support of the gay lifestyle. These Two Men are Clearly Partners Not all depictions of close relationships between men are necessarily gay.

The terms homosocial and homoerotic describe some of these other possibilities. Homosociality is the situation of men being in close or intimate relationship with other men and does not imply either homosexuality or heterosexuality whereas homoerotic refers to erotic imagery that depicts same-sex people in a sexualized manner.

The image below shows two men lying together on a bed or blanket in their underwear. Their relationship is clearly homosocial, but their touching, intimacy, and exhibitionism suggests the possibility of homoeroticism as well. Most significantly, the ad confronts the cultural taboo concerning homophobia by permitting extreme closeness between men, sharing intimacy even if it is not specifically sexual , and expressing emotional warmth.

Perhaps the appeal of this kind of display for straight men is the relief it offers from strict do's and don'ts when it comes to relating to other men. FYI… Critics of advertising decry fashion's objectification of women and its glamorization of violence, abuse, and even rape. Search "objectification of women in fashion advertising" on the Internet. The world of fashion appears to have an easier time pushing all kinds of limits in its depictions. Lesbian chic is everywhere.

Men dominate and abuse women. It almost seems anything goes when it comes to fashion. This Sisley Ad Eroticizes Abuse circa Humor is a mainstay in the domain of sex and advertising. This humor is often adolescent and ribald and typically serves to bolster male bravado about penis size and power. Here are some examples: The Burger King ad below employs male adolescent humor: It has been passed around on the Internet on various websites and elicited this response from Burger King:.

This advertisement is running to support a limited promotion in the Singapore market and is not running in the U. This idea of a sandwich that is so large it will stretch the limits of one's mouth seems to have been used Burger King advertising elsewhere. The one below was used in Germany in Note that again the model is female, although in reality men might be more likely to order enormous sandwiches than women.

When ads like this resonate with the public—or at least a certain segment of it—they often become the subject of parodies. An Internet site took the Burger King ad from Germany and substituted the name of a different advertiser—Durex condoms. In this case, it is clear that the woman's mouth was injured from sex rather than food. Examples of phallus-shaped products abound in the world of marketing.

One need only think of cylindrical bottles with caps, or foods like sausages and cucumbers, and so on. However, there are some instances where products are made to look distinctly like male or female genitals. In a Bici ad from Italy, the choice of the particular pieces of bread and their placement specifically suggest an erect penis.

Even the testicles are present in this image. Further, the connection between bread as life and the biology of reproduction is present. There are no subtleties here.

The Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas used the play on words "buck all night" to appeal to the largely adult male audience of a rodeo event. The Nevada Gaming Commission objected to the billboard's overt sexual content and required it to be removed. Sexual humor is used to promote all manner of products—fast food, condoms, soap, and beer.

Sometimes the images that appear to be ads are not even ads, but rather parodies or imagined ads where the same male bravado about penis size and power is highlighted. Both kinds illustrate an important point about how humor is typically used in advertising: It is the male point of view that is nearly always privileged. There is no parallel celebration of the power of the vagina—a power to please oneself and one's partner, a power to generate new life, a power to engulf as opposed to penetrate.

What does it mean to call an ad pornographic? It depends, of course, on how pornography is defined. Historically this has been the subject of debate, contention, and legal opinions. Critics have described fashion designer and film director Tom Ford's advertisements as "artistic. Certainly, from the point of view of composition, lighting, suggestiveness, beauty, allure, and a host of other attributes, they can be said to be deserving of attention and commentary.

For the world of advertising, Ford's work parallels the work of other daring artists who have done such avant-garde things as placing a crucifix in a bottle of urine or wrapping large buildings in plastic. Is This Erotica or Pornography? Edmund Miller's encyclopedia entry on erotica as a literary genre describes its difference from pornography this way:. As a literary genre, pornography is writing that has sexual arousal as its primary objective. Erotica is such material with artistic pretensions.

Thus, the descriptive term pornography implies a statement about intentionality and instrumentality without reference to merit, whereas the term erotica is evaluative and laudatory. In Flesh and the Word , John Preston more baldly says, "The only difference is that erotica is the stuff bought by rich people. Since current literary theory makes writing of every sort available to analysis, it has in effect done away with the distinction. To discuss the aesthetic effect of pornographic material is to accord it the status of erotica.

This same distinction applies also to the world of visual art and thus to advertising. Is the Tom Ford ad erotica or pornography? It might be called pornographic because the bottle of men's fragrance is placed between the woman's breasts, suggesting mammary intercourse. Some would call this kind of imagery pornographic. Others, however, would see this as a sexually charged, artistic work that pushes the limits of the conventional and encourages the spectator to think in a specific way about the product and the brand.

Thus, the same image—depending how the audience responds to it—can be either pornographic or erotic. Thus, discussions about some of the most explicit advertising garner two kinds of responses. First, there are those who see it as pornographic and inappropriate for public cultural spaces. They would like to see it censored and banned. Often their arguments are couched in religious terms, or in terms of protecting the innocence of children.

Second, there are those who see it as erotica and thus indeed appropriate for public culture. They enjoy being challenged by the images and discussions that surround them.

The marketers and advertisers who produce it belong, of course, to this latter world. They speak of it as "pushing the limits" and "breaking through the clutter. The relationship between advertising and sex also includes those instances when sexually related products and services are being promoted. Such things include erectile dysfunction drugs, condoms, genital hygiene products, birth control, and so on.

In many of these ads, sex itself is made a lot less explicit than we have seen in other instances. The topics discussed and the products themselves are handled more delicately and even indirectly. Imagine, for instance, a condom ad or an erectile dysfunction ad that actually showed the product at work.

Here is an example of what we find instead: The ad makes it clear that these are heterosexual couples in committed relationships. It makes love and intimacy a large part of the imagery 46 and asks, "when the moment is right, will you be ready? Although these drugs are sometimes used recreationally, and by gay as well as straight men, such matters go unmentioned in the ads. Nonetheless, there are many critics of this advertising.

For example, US Congressman Jim Moran D-VA recently proposed banning these commercials during early evening hours when children are likely to be a part of the audience. A number of people have come up, including colleagues and said, "I'm fed up. I don't want my three- or four-year old grandkid asking me what erectile dysfunction is all about. Pfizer offers its Viagra advertising schedule each week for posting on the Parents Television Council's website so that people who may wish to avoid them may do so.

Condom ads, once banned on US television, are now accepted on many broadcast and cable channels as well as on the Internet. These ads in general depart from the indirectness of ED advertising and talk much more explicitly about sex. The following ad, which ran on MTV, shows a much bolder side of sex—a young, experienced woman about to have an interracial one-night stand. The only euphemism present is her rather sarcastic, "Gotta have the ticket if you want to ride the ride.

The subject of female hygiene spray has been much discussed as an instance of the appropriateness of the product itself as well as the way it is discussed and talked about in ads. Less common, although present from time to time, is the recognition that men have distinctive male odors as well. The short-lived NodorO product threatened men with sexual rejection unless they used it to eliminate the possibility of odors. Both members of the public and academic critics of advertising sometimes consider that advertising steps over the line of decency and appropriateness in its representations.

A study by Melbourne's La Trobe University found that young Australians are now drinking around 50 per cent less alcohol than people the same age 10 years ago. Results from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's AIHW National Drug Strategy Household Survey, released last year, found that nearly 94 per cent of 12 to year-olds and 58 per cent of 16 to year-olds did not drink at all - both increases from the previous survey.

News Counting dead Australians shows the sad impact of violence. News Thousands hacked from malicious software discovered. Local Queensland National World Offbeat. Events Place an Event Gigs Competitions. Motoring News Big Rigs. The study has tracked 16, people born in and since they were aged These stock photo models get it. Some experts have suggested the ubiquity of porn is harming our sex lives. Related Items Would you have sex while your dog's in the room?

Two words that screwed Gen Ys. Queen pulls out of service due to illness 29th Jun 2: Two men now charged with manslaughter over Ballina death. Flights cancelled as Mt Agung erupts again.

Just be true to your own personal brand. Here is how it can work for you:. That means you need to know whom you want to go after and what these potential partners are looking for in a mate. It helps if you focus first on them and less on yourself…at least for this step. Most men I know seek the same core qualities in a female partner—trust, a sense of humor, someone they enjoy hanging out with, someone who has similar interests and values, and of course, sex.

Next, you need to know where they can be found. I am sure you know where people hang out in the city. Bars, gyms, classes, work, clubs, the park, ball games, etc. If you cannot find someone interesting in the city, invest in a new pair of glasses.

Every so often it helps to take a step back and re-examine who we are, what we are and how we roll. Many of us make the same mistakes over and over when it comes to relationships. It could be our attitude towards the opposite sex, how we present ourselves, or even that mental checklist for sizing up potential partners that might include everything from his bank account or his shoes, to her height or her cup size.

Once you know who you are and what you want, consider what qualities you can offer a potential partner that is totally you— your special sauce, if you will. Yes, like on a Big Mac. Once you know your market and where they live fish where the fish are , and know who you are and that you are fantastic and probably the best thing that will ever happen to your potential partner—you need to get up and get out.

Just be you and love your life. A few laps around the online dating track can work wonders if you have some common sense and confidence. FYI… Read a fuller statement by Reichert on: After reviewing evidence from the mids to the early s, Reichert concludes that using sex in advertising has frequently, but not always, increased consumer interest and often aided in the selling products and building strong brand identities.

However, he notes that academic research on its effects has yielded equivocal and inconsistent conclusions, making it exceedingly difficult to render a clear verdict on its effectiveness. Despite this caveat, Reichert believes that several companies—such as Calvin Klein and Victoria's Secret—have succeeded in linking erotic appeals with commercial success. Likewise, public response has varied considerably. Some consumers respond with their pocketbooks to the sexual promises in ads while others complain that sexual imagery in ads oversteps the bounds of propriety.

The advertising images that follow are indicative of many but certainly not all of the things that advertising says about sex. Taken together, they indicate not only the typical but also the extremes to which advertising has gone in linking eroticism to the selling process. These ads not only attempt to sell various products soap, beer, cars, underwear, etc. They tell us what is sexy, they show people in various states of love-making, they idealize and idolize certain kinds of bodies over others, they depict "vanilla" as well as "alternative" forms of sexual behavior, and so on.

In short, the ads not only sell products but also sell a particular conception of sex itself. What does sex in advertising sell?

Above all else, advertising images have depicted heterosexuality as the norm throughout. There are exceptions as we shall see, but the most frequent representations are the one-male, one-female type. Moreover, it is usually the male who assumes the more dominant position and role, while the female is generally receptive and somewhat passive.

Most typically, the ad suggests and hints at sexual relations between the couple—often showing them in some sort of sexual foreplay. However, some ads go so far as to leave little doubt that the couple is engaged in sexual intercourse.

Here a man stands before a woman whose widespread legs admit him to her most intimate body zone. Their pose suggests the heightened excitement of a "quickie" for which she has not yet had the time to remove all of her clothes. Heterosexuality is the Traditional Norm in Advertising Nowadays, this heteronormativity is giving way to a variety of non-"traditional" alternatives. It is common to see one man with multiple female partners, a pattern that appears to be a widely shared sexual fantasy among heterosexual men.

However, there are also situations in which the female partner assumes a more active and dominant role, and situations in which the one-male, one-female relationship gives way to a variety of other possibilities.

Gay relationships have also entered the world of sex as depicted in ads. They are to be found in ads for beer, over-the-counter medicines, life insurance, tires, and just about everything else. In a world so dominated by heteronormativity, it would be remiss to speak of a parallel homonormativity, because such depictions are still relatively few in number compared to the much more frequent imagery of heterosexuality. Advertisers are careful about their placement of such ads as well.

Venues for depictions of gay relationships are restricted. FYI… Read about the protests against the Tylenol ad showing two men in bed with one another. The following ad for Tylenol shows two men in the same bed close enough to be touching. Lest there is any doubt about their relationship, the ad speaks of them as boyfriends. This particular ad ran in The Advocate , a gay-oriented magazine.

However, a fundamentalist Christian group found the ad and organized a write-in campaign to the company complaining about its apparent support of the gay lifestyle.

These Two Men are Clearly Partners Not all depictions of close relationships between men are necessarily gay. The terms homosocial and homoerotic describe some of these other possibilities. Homosociality is the situation of men being in close or intimate relationship with other men and does not imply either homosexuality or heterosexuality whereas homoerotic refers to erotic imagery that depicts same-sex people in a sexualized manner.

The image below shows two men lying together on a bed or blanket in their underwear. Their relationship is clearly homosocial, but their touching, intimacy, and exhibitionism suggests the possibility of homoeroticism as well. Most significantly, the ad confronts the cultural taboo concerning homophobia by permitting extreme closeness between men, sharing intimacy even if it is not specifically sexual , and expressing emotional warmth. Perhaps the appeal of this kind of display for straight men is the relief it offers from strict do's and don'ts when it comes to relating to other men.

FYI… Critics of advertising decry fashion's objectification of women and its glamorization of violence, abuse, and even rape. Search "objectification of women in fashion advertising" on the Internet. The world of fashion appears to have an easier time pushing all kinds of limits in its depictions. Lesbian chic is everywhere. Men dominate and abuse women. It almost seems anything goes when it comes to fashion.

This Sisley Ad Eroticizes Abuse circa Humor is a mainstay in the domain of sex and advertising. This humor is often adolescent and ribald and typically serves to bolster male bravado about penis size and power. Here are some examples: The Burger King ad below employs male adolescent humor: It has been passed around on the Internet on various websites and elicited this response from Burger King:. This advertisement is running to support a limited promotion in the Singapore market and is not running in the U.

This idea of a sandwich that is so large it will stretch the limits of one's mouth seems to have been used Burger King advertising elsewhere.

The one below was used in Germany in Note that again the model is female, although in reality men might be more likely to order enormous sandwiches than women. When ads like this resonate with the public—or at least a certain segment of it—they often become the subject of parodies.

An Internet site took the Burger King ad from Germany and substituted the name of a different advertiser—Durex condoms. In this case, it is clear that the woman's mouth was injured from sex rather than food. Examples of phallus-shaped products abound in the world of marketing. One need only think of cylindrical bottles with caps, or foods like sausages and cucumbers, and so on. However, there are some instances where products are made to look distinctly like male or female genitals.

In a Bici ad from Italy, the choice of the particular pieces of bread and their placement specifically suggest an erect penis. Even the testicles are present in this image. Further, the connection between bread as life and the biology of reproduction is present. There are no subtleties here. The Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas used the play on words "buck all night" to appeal to the largely adult male audience of a rodeo event.

The Nevada Gaming Commission objected to the billboard's overt sexual content and required it to be removed. Sexual humor is used to promote all manner of products—fast food, condoms, soap, and beer. Sometimes the images that appear to be ads are not even ads, but rather parodies or imagined ads where the same male bravado about penis size and power is highlighted.

Both kinds illustrate an important point about how humor is typically used in advertising: It is the male point of view that is nearly always privileged. There is no parallel celebration of the power of the vagina—a power to please oneself and one's partner, a power to generate new life, a power to engulf as opposed to penetrate. What does it mean to call an ad pornographic? It depends, of course, on how pornography is defined. Historically this has been the subject of debate, contention, and legal opinions.

Critics have described fashion designer and film director Tom Ford's advertisements as "artistic. Certainly, from the point of view of composition, lighting, suggestiveness, beauty, allure, and a host of other attributes, they can be said to be deserving of attention and commentary.

For the world of advertising, Ford's work parallels the work of other daring artists who have done such avant-garde things as placing a crucifix in a bottle of urine or wrapping large buildings in plastic.

Is This Erotica or Pornography? Edmund Miller's encyclopedia entry on erotica as a literary genre describes its difference from pornography this way:. As a literary genre, pornography is writing that has sexual arousal as its primary objective. Erotica is such material with artistic pretensions. Thus, the descriptive term pornography implies a statement about intentionality and instrumentality without reference to merit, whereas the term erotica is evaluative and laudatory. In Flesh and the Word , John Preston more baldly says, "The only difference is that erotica is the stuff bought by rich people.

Since current literary theory makes writing of every sort available to analysis, it has in effect done away with the distinction. To discuss the aesthetic effect of pornographic material is to accord it the status of erotica. This same distinction applies also to the world of visual art and thus to advertising. Is the Tom Ford ad erotica or pornography? It might be called pornographic because the bottle of men's fragrance is placed between the woman's breasts, suggesting mammary intercourse.

Some would call this kind of imagery pornographic. Others, however, would see this as a sexually charged, artistic work that pushes the limits of the conventional and encourages the spectator to think in a specific way about the product and the brand. Thus, the same image—depending how the audience responds to it—can be either pornographic or erotic.

Thus, discussions about some of the most explicit advertising garner two kinds of responses. First, there are those who see it as pornographic and inappropriate for public cultural spaces.

They would like to see it censored and banned. Often their arguments are couched in religious terms, or in terms of protecting the innocence of children.

Second, there are those who see it as erotica and thus indeed appropriate for public culture. They enjoy being challenged by the images and discussions that surround them.

The marketers and advertisers who produce it belong, of course, to this latter world. They speak of it as "pushing the limits" and "breaking through the clutter. The relationship between advertising and sex also includes those instances when sexually related products and services are being promoted. Such things include erectile dysfunction drugs, condoms, genital hygiene products, birth control, and so on. In many of these ads, sex itself is made a lot less explicit than we have seen in other instances.

The topics discussed and the products themselves are handled more delicately and even indirectly. Imagine, for instance, a condom ad or an erectile dysfunction ad that actually showed the product at work. Here is an example of what we find instead: The ad makes it clear that these are heterosexual couples in committed relationships. It makes love and intimacy a large part of the imagery 46 and asks, "when the moment is right, will you be ready? Although these drugs are sometimes used recreationally, and by gay as well as straight men, such matters go unmentioned in the ads.

Nonetheless, there are many critics of this advertising. For example, US Congressman Jim Moran D-VA recently proposed banning these commercials during early evening hours when children are likely to be a part of the audience. A number of people have come up, including colleagues and said, "I'm fed up. I don't want my three- or four-year old grandkid asking me what erectile dysfunction is all about.

Pfizer offers its Viagra advertising schedule each week for posting on the Parents Television Council's website so that people who may wish to avoid them may do so. Condom ads, once banned on US television, are now accepted on many broadcast and cable channels as well as on the Internet.

These ads in general depart from the indirectness of ED advertising and talk much more explicitly about sex. The following ad, which ran on MTV, shows a much bolder side of sex—a young, experienced woman about to have an interracial one-night stand. The only euphemism present is her rather sarcastic, "Gotta have the ticket if you want to ride the ride.

The subject of female hygiene spray has been much discussed as an instance of the appropriateness of the product itself as well as the way it is discussed and talked about in ads.

Less common, although present from time to time, is the recognition that men have distinctive male odors as well. The short-lived NodorO product threatened men with sexual rejection unless they used it to eliminate the possibility of odors. Both members of the public and academic critics of advertising sometimes consider that advertising steps over the line of decency and appropriateness in its representations. As noted earlier, certain fundamentalist Christian groups have objected to depictions of gay relationships while others in the society consider them appropriate, refreshing, and even celebratory.

Additionally, a US Congressman wants to restrict commercials for ED drugs to times when young children are not likely to be watching television. There is never likely to be any universal agreement as to what is decent and appropriate and what is not. Consider the following additional examples. The following ad for the German men's magazine Deutsch certainly breaks through advertising clutter.

Its unconventionality attracts attention. It is an explicit depiction of an alternative form of sex. Many people react with horror to human-animal sexual relationships, but here bestiality enters the world of advertising. This kind of behavior by household pets is a reality and occurs to the chagrin of many women, but here it is fetishized and eroticized. This Ad Eroticizes Bestiality What of nudity itself? There is a long tradition in Western art of depicting the human body as nude.

We accept this as normative and seldom question it, although there are instances of Popes and other religiously motivated people insisting on covering the natural human body.

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